Planned Giving

Leave a lasting legacy by supporting disabled veterans with a bequest to Vets365.

Planned giving is the process of making a significant charitable gift during a donor’s life or at death that is part of his or her financial or estate plan.  Planned gifts can range from the relatively simple bequest made in a will, to gifts like charitable gift annuities and charitable remainder trusts that provide major gifts to a non-profit while at the same time returning income to the donor.

Bequests: These make up the majority of most planned gifts. Anyone can make a bequest to a nonprofit through their will or estate plan. Donors can allocate a specific amount of money to give after they die, either in a lump sum or a percentage of their total wealth, or they can choose to give the remainder of their estate to a nonprofit after all of their other bequests are paid.

Charitable gift annuities: This is an agreement in which the donor gives a large gift to a nonprofit, receives a tax deduction at the time of the gift, and then receives payments from the nonprofit during their lifetime. The nonprofit may invest the money to grow its income, and after the donor’s death, the nonprofit can use the remaining donation.

Charitable trusts: Charitable remainder trusts are tax-exempt, irrevocable trusts that make annual payments to the beneficiaries for a certain amount of time, and then donate the remainder to a nonprofit. Charitable lead trusts are similar, except that the annual payments go to the nonprofit for a certain period of time, and the remainder goes to the beneficiaries.

Pooled income funds: These are charitable trusts that are established by nonprofit organizations. Donors contribute to the fund, the nonprofit invests the contributions, and it pays dividends to the donors during their lifetimes. The fund distributes the remaining assets to the designated charity or charities.

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